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Ulster Historical Foundation Richard Macmaster - Flaxseed and Emigrants: Scotch-Irish Merchants in Eighteenth-century America Ulster Historical Foundation Richard Macmaster - Flaxseed and Emigrants: Scotch-Irish Merchants in Eighteenth-century America

Pages: 324, Paperback, Ulster Historical Foundation

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Ulster Historical Foundation Eileen Black - Window to an age: A chronicle of art in Belfast Ulster Historical Foundation Eileen Black - Window to an age: A chronicle of art in Belfast

Pages: 494, Hardcover, Ulster Historical Foundation

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Ulster Historical Foundation Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland: Parishes of Co. Antrim XIII 1833, 1835, 1838: 1833, 1835, 1838, Temple Patrick and District Vol 35 (The Ordnance Survey memoirs of Ireland 1830-1840) Ulster Historical Foundation Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland: Parishes of Co. Antrim XIII 1833, 1835, 1838: 1833, 1835, 1838, Temple Patrick and District Vol 35 (The Ordnance Survey memoirs of Ireland 1830-1840)

Pages: 178, Paperback, Ulster Historical Foundation

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Ulster Historical Foundation Declan Martin - Irish Politics in Postcards Ulster Historical Foundation Declan Martin - Irish Politics in Postcards

Pages: 200, Paperback, Ulster Historical Foundation

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Ulster Historical Foundation Andrew Stewart - Presbyterian History in Ireland: Two Seventeenth- Century Narratives Ulster Historical Foundation Andrew Stewart - Presbyterian History in Ireland: Two Seventeenth- Century Narratives

This volume makes available to a modern audience two seventeenth-century texts that are critical to our understanding of the emergence of Presbyterianism in Ireland. Patrick Adair's 'True narrative of the rise and progress of the Presbyterian Government in the north of Ireland' can be considered the origin text of the Ulster Presbyterian historical tradition. It is the earliest known account of the emergence of Presbyterianism in the province, covering the period from the 1620s to c. 1670, and was written by someone who witnessed at first hand many of the episodes he describes. This fresh edition is based on the earliest surviving manuscript copy of Adair's text held by the Presbyterian Historical Society of Ireland.

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Ulster Historical Foundation W.A. Maguire - Captain Cohonny: Constantine Maguire of Tempo (Belfast Society publication series) Ulster Historical Foundation W.A. Maguire - Captain Cohonny: Constantine Maguire of Tempo (Belfast Society publication series)

The Maguires of Tempo, whose substantial estate dated from the Ulster Plantation in 1610, were the only gaelic family in Fermanagh to survive the upheavals of the next two centuries with their property more or less intact. By the time Constantine Maguire - the subject of this book - inherited in 1800, however, only a fraction remained. The extraordinary story of this resourceful, not to say ruthless, man's struggle to retain his social standing - in the course of which he married a famous courtesan and then fell in love with a mistress of his own (who lived with him for the seven years he chose to stay in the debtors' prison in Dublin) - reads like a novel of the period. His brutal murder in Tipperary in 1834 was a suitably gothic finishing touch to a rackety career. At a more serious level, the tale of Captain Cohonny' throws useful light on some obscure aspects of life and death in early nineteenth century Ireland.

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Ulster Historical Foundation David Stevenson - Scottish Covenanters and Irish Confederates: Scottish-Irish Relations in the Mid-Seventeenth Century Ulster Historical Foundation David Stevenson - Scottish Covenanters and Irish Confederates: Scottish-Irish Relations in the Mid-Seventeenth Century

The New Scots, the men of the army the Scottish covenanters sent to Ireland, were the most formidable opponents of the Irish confederates for several crucial years in the 1640s, preventing them conquering all Ireland and destroying the Protestant plantation in Ulster. The greatest challenge to the power of the covenanters in Scotland at a time when they seemed invincible came from a largely Irish army, sent to Scotland by the confederates and commanded by the royalist marquis of Montrose. Thus the relations of Scotland and Ireland are clearly of great importance in understanding the complex 'War of the Three Kingdoms' and the interactions of the civil wars and revolutions of England, Scotland and Ireland in the mid-seventeenth century. But though historians have studied Anglo-Scottish and Anglo-Irish relations extensively, Scottish-Irish relations have been largely neglected. Scottish Covenanters and Irish Confederates attempts to fill this gap, and in doing so provides the first comprehensive study of the Scottish Army in Ireland.

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Ulster Historical Foundation Tony Deeson - The Stones That Grind the Corn Ulster Historical Foundation Tony Deeson - The Stones That Grind the Corn

[The history of the Scott family corn mill in Omagh, Country Tyrone, established during the days of the Great Famine. The book provides much historical and social information on the Omagh area, and includes a foreword by Benedict Kiely and poems by W. F. Marshall. There is also a chapter giving a brief history of milling].

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Ulster Historical Foundation Jonathan Bardon - The Struggle for Shared Schools in Northern Ireland: The History of All Children Together Ulster Historical Foundation Jonathan Bardon - The Struggle for Shared Schools in Northern Ireland: The History of All Children Together

Starting out as a small but energetic and, above all, committed group of parents in County Down in the early 1970s, All Children Together (ACT) believed that, as long as children continued to be educated separately, there was little hope of healing the festering wounds in a society blighted by bitter division. This is the story of the pioneers of the integrated education movement in Northern Ireland. The book chronicles how ACT faced powerful establishment resistance - both clerical and lay - to a vision that would see children of all religions and no religion educated together. At the political level it describes how, crucially, ACT persuaded Westminster to pass enabling legislation in 1978. Then, in 1981, came the great leap of faith with the establishment of what would become the flagship of the movement, Lagan College, with a mere 28 pupils. Thereafter ACT embarked on a programme to convince government to make funds available to parent groups, wishing to do so, to found integrated schools. Despite frequent setbacks the movement developed at an impressive pace until, by September 2008, there were 19,183 pupils in 62 schools in every part of Northern Ireland. Jonathan Bardon has spoken to many of those involved from the outset in the campaigns for shared schools, and trawled through reports, newspapers, the unpublished records of ACT and government files recently opened under the 30-year rule. What emerges is a remarkable tale of determination, tenacity, courage, dedication and, above all, vision by ordinary men and women from both sides of the religious divide. Their example moved Lord Mawhinney to describe them as 'among the first genuine peace people'. Indeed, it could be said that no account of the Troubles is complete if it omits the story of All Children Together, a story that has given Northern Ireland a platform on which to build a post-conflict society based on respect for all traditions and religions.

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Ulster Historical Foundation Bill Jackson - The Irish Friend, 1837-1842: Excerpts from the pioneer Quaker newspaper Ulster Historical Foundation Bill Jackson - The Irish Friend, 1837-1842: Excerpts from the pioneer Quaker newspaper

In 1837, from the relative obscurity of Belfast, an equally obscure but frenetically active merchant suddenly sprang a newspaper on the unsuspecting and rather closed Quaker community of Ireland and Britain. Five years on, he equally suddenly pulled the plug on it. At its height, The Irish Friend was being read by half the households of the Society of Friends in these islands, and many others besides. William Bell was its 'its sole proprietor, financier, Editor, sub-editor, dispatch clerk, advertisements clerk, manager, secretary and general factotum'. In its 684 pages The Irish Friend brought Quakers back to the basics of the faith and practice of their 17th century founders, yet was in many ways miles ahead of its time. This apparent contradiction is well reflected in this attractive commonplace book. If some of the 150 excerpts chosen are reactionary in regard to, say, novels, the theatre or alcohol, others are trenchant and progressive, even by today's standards, on slavery, colonisation, pacifism, capital punishment, prison reform or the role of women. A masterly essay on the paper by a former editor of The Friend, carried by way of introduction, acknowledges that The Irish Friend pioneered Quaker journalism on this side of the Atlantic. Within weeks of its demise it had to be replaced by media which have lasted to the present day. Selected for secular and philanthropic rather than devotional content, and for Irish resonance, this colourful mix of articles, poems, advertisements, curiosities and contemporary illustrations is enhanced by contributions from or about such figures as Daniel O'Connell, Elizabeth Fry, Thomas Hodgkin, Mungo Park and John Bright. On everything from aborigines to rabies, from the founding days of the Friends Provident to mixed marriages, it makes for a fascinating late-Georgian 'scrapbook' into which historians, students, thinkers - and the plain reader - will find themselves dipping again and again.

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